Alternative Healing in China

BY CHINA UNDERGROUND
May 09, 2011

Qigong, drinking urine, eating ants… Some Chinese would resort to just about anything for good health.

 

670 In the '80s and early '90s Qigong presentations took place in front of a delirious audience

 

671 During the winter of 1989, Ditan Park in Beijing was a favourite place to practice Qigong.

 

 

At that time other mystical beliefs were combined with the practice of Qigong.

 

672 April 2002, in a street in Wanzhou, Chongqing: A "doctor" (unlicensed) practises cupping on an old lady.

 

673 Gua Sha, literally "to scrape away fever" in Chinese, is an ancient medical treatment. Gua Sha involves repeated pressured strokes over lubricated skin with a smooth edge. Commonly a ceramic Chinese soup spoon was used, or a well worn coin, even honed animal bones, water buffalo horn, or jade. A simple metal cap with a rounded edge is commonly used. (Wikipedia) Many people believe that scraping can help balance blood, raise the fatigue and increase immune function of the body.

 

674 Some people in fact think that ants are rich in protein which helps the body against ageing

 

675 August 8, 2004: About 30 people during a convention in Guangzhou drink urine.

 

676 June 11, 2006: in Hangzhou the first restaurant for revival of sexual appetite opens. Here's Lubian, a tonic for the male audience.

 

677 April 24, 2010, Wuhan: A doctor treats a patient with Apitherapy

 

678 January 11, 2009, a group of people devoted to "Happiness Therapy". Participants think that even a fake smile can help.

 

679 September 23, 2009: Vinegar foot bath in Shanxi

 

680 May 2, 2010, Anshan, Liaoning. Mud baths at a spa (concept imported from the West)

 

681 August 8, 2010, Xuchang, Henan Province: A performance of Qigong in public.

 

682 July 24, 2005: 20 Germans have prepared a 7-day trip to Wudang Mountain to learn the use of the 12 Wudang Kam.

 

683 Jinyun Mountain Taoist Association had 30,000 followers; including business tycoon Jack Ma, the founder of Chinese e-commerce firm alibaba.com; and pop singer Faye Wong. The association promoted the restoration of kidney functions through massage. Li Yi, the founder of the Jinyun Mountain Taoist Association, later became the focus of a police probe over an alleged rape of a college student. Li is the latest "grand master" exposed as a fraud.

 

684 Making money writing health books – it's easy in China, especially if you're a celebrity...

 

Sources: news.163.com, CSI

 

This post was originally published on China Underground in April 2011.